Saturday, June 28, 2014

Jew Feinstein Coming at Your Internet Freedoms, Again

Jew Feinstein Coming at Your Internet Freedoms, Again

Daily Stormer
June 28, 2014
Wicked Jewess  Dianne Feinstein is in your internet, taking your freedoms.
Good Gojims needing more protecting, keeping to safety time. Good gojims not needing to freedom, freedoming bringing danger to good gojims. Chosen people cannot Jewing the good gojims, so you not worrying.
The sickening evil Jewess Dianne Feinstein, an alien parasite completely obsessed with stripping White Americans of all of their most basic human freedoms, has brought back the campaign to crush internet freedom in the name of “oh my god I’m so scared someone could do something bad” ninnying female nonsense that the Jews are capable of selling to our woman and faggot dominated society.
CISPA is back for a third time—it has lost the ‘P,’ but it’s just as bad for civil liberties as ever.
The Senate Intelligence Committee is considering a new cybersecurity bill that contains many of the provisions that civil liberties groups hated about the Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). Most notably, under the proposed bill companies could not be sued for incorrectly sharing too much customer information with the federal government, and broad law enforcement sharing could allow for the creation of backdoor wiretaps.
The bill, called the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014 (embedded below), was written by Senate Intelligence Chair Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) and is currently circulating around the committee right now but has not yet been introduced. Right now, the bill is only a “discussion draft,” and the committee is still looking to make revisions to the bill before it is officially introduced.
In any case, the bill will look familiar to anyone who has followed the trials and tribulations of CISPA: The general premise of the bill is to allow the federal government to share classified “cyber threat” information with companies (which is good), but also allows companies to share “cyber threat” information about their customers with the federal government—which could be bad, depending on how it’s implemented. Any programs created by the bill would be under the authority of the Department of Homeland Security, which is important, because it’s a civilian, not military group such as the National Security Administration.
If you’ll remember, the Senate is where the last CISPA went to die, and other Senate cybersecurity bills have limited the circumstances under which data can be shared with law enforcement. Not so in Feinstein’s new bill. The language of the draft would give companies a wide latitude to share information, in real time, with state, local, and federal law enforcement, a move that’s concerning to civil liberties experts.
“I think the Senate bill was much much better placed when this issue came up before—it limited law enforcement use to very specific circumstances, such as when there was the threat of imminent death or bodily injury,” Greg Nojeim, senior counsel at the Center for Democracy and Technology, told me. “This very broad criminal purpose creates the possibility that cybersecurity information sharing becomes a backdoor wiretap, because law enforcement would be receiving information it otherwise would not get unless it showed probable cause. You don’t want a world where very robust cybersecurity information sharing turns into a law enforcement tool that’s used to prosecute people for completely unrelated crime.”
It’s clear in the draft language that Feinstein is trying to assuage the concerns of civil liberties groups, but they’re still not going to be terribly happy with many of the provisions. The bill generally requires that companies strip identifying information from any information shared with the government that could pertain to a person not directly involved with a “cyber threat” and also calls for the attorney general to meet with civil liberties groups to devise the final policies and procedures for how the whole thing would work within 30 days of the bill’s passage.
But even those provisions don’t go far enough or have loopholes, according to Amie Stepanovich of the civil liberties group Access. While any information that goes from the government to private companies would have identifying information in it stripped, Stepanovich says there’s a “loophole large enough to drive a semi-truck through” that would allow companies to leave identifying information if someone tangentially relates to a cyber threat.
“A ‘cyber threat’ could mean you’re just on a spam email list,” and are therefore subject to having your information shared with the government, she said.
The bill also calls for the government to create some sort of “notification system” to let companies know when they’ve shared data that doesn’t pertain to a specific cyber threat.
In an utterly feminized and broken society, people are willing to go along with anything as long as they are told some vague danger exists.
Real men, who used to run European societies, revelled in danger.
And real men still do their best: they skateboard and ride motorcycles and get in bar fights.
But there is little danger left.
Until the race war cometh.

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